“Gifted, Bullied, Resilient”: Blog Reviews, Thus Far

Early reviews of Gifted Bullied Resilient RedWhiteandGrew.com

Earlier this summer I approached a few blog friends to review Gifted, Bullied, Resilient: A Brief Guide for Smart Families [ Available NOW via: Amazon {Kindle} | Barnes and Noble {Nook} ]. Since the book has been out now for almost a month, I thought it’d be fun to recap the reviews thus far. From what these gifted advocates have shared–and other readers have told me, the vibe and gist of what Sarah Wilson (my editor) and I were striving to communicate came through the page.

First this summer came a review by Jen Merrill (a fellow GHF Press author). She wrote:

In her clear and precise prose, Pamela lays out exactly what bullying is and what it isn’t. She provides suggestions on how to handle bullying in a traditional school situation, as well as in a homeschool co-op or extra-curricular activity. Throughout the book are short snippets from parents whose kids experienced bullying of various sorts, and other snippets from parents explaining how they worked with their children to deal with and eliminate the bullying. I especially appreciated chapter five, Nurturing Resilience and Healthy Relationships, with its focus on mindfulness and scaffolding and modeling self-care (parents, heal thyselves). If you’re a fan of The King, Pamela even included a conversation with an elderly woman she knew who grew up with Elvis, and until the end of her life remembered the bullying he endured, simply for being different. A tall poppy, too big for his britches, different. Sound familiar?

Gifted, Bullied, Resilient is a game-changer. It is the book for the gifted community that we’ve long needed. {Read More}

Next came a post by Jade Rivera:

When groups of girls bullied me, I was devastated but I wasn’t surprised. After brief residencies at a couple different schools, I realized that kids everywhere were pretty much the same… and I was not. I expressed my devastation by withdrawing and losing trust in innocent friendly gestures.

Before reading Pamela Price’s new book, Gifted, Bullied, Resilient: A Brief Guide for Smart Families, I would reflect on that time and have no idea what could’ve helped. It also made it difficult to know if I was effectively supporting my students when they shared their experiences of bullying.

After reading Pamela’s book, now I know I needed two things as a child. . . . {Read More}

Paula Prober wrote:

Using poignant personal examples, careful research, and stories from parents of gifted kids, Price explains why gifted children are bullied, the impact it can have on the child and the family, what parents can do about it and how families can produce more resilient children. {Read More}

Mona Chicks shared a glimpse at her family’s experience with bullying and commented:

I wish I’d had Pamela Price’s new book, Gifted, Bullied, Resilient: A Brief Guide for Smart Families, back then. Price has woven personal stories, in-depth research, and helpful tools together in this short and beautifully-written guidebook. She addresses the gifted kids being bullied, when the gifted child is the bully, adult-on-child bullying, and special circumstances of dealing with bullying and twice-exceptional children. She focuses on how you – the parent, teacher, or other adult – can help (hint: resilience is in the title!), and shines hope into what can feel like a hopeless situation. She provides links to resources – most of them free – for educators, administrators, and parents to help in the classroom or in social situations where bullying is occurring. {Read More}

Obviously, one doesn’t want to play “favorites” with heartfelt review, but the reviews by Madeline Goodwin (shared previously) and another by Inga Cotton were especially satisfying. They each gave fresh perspectives on bullying, with Inga, a charter school proponent, indicating the article fired her up to become more proactive. Inga wrote:

As someone who visits, evaluates, and writes about school choices, I was especially interested in Price’s discussion how to prevent bullying in our school communities, and I know I will revisit those passages again and again. Bullying is a significant reason why families look for change, whether to a charter school or to homeschooling. I’ve observed wide differences among charter schools in the prevalence of bullying and in the ways the school leadership addresses character development. . . .

Gifted, Bullied, Resilient is a toolkit for building “quality interpersonal relationships and positive emotional growth.” It will help you raise your own gifted kids, and you may find solace and healing for your own wounds from childhood. I hope to use the book as a tool to help my communities (i.e., charter schools) become kinder and more accepting of differences. {Read More}

Celi Trepanier, a teacher turned homeschool parent turned author, opted to interview me for her blog. She shared with her readers this introduction:

Your perception of bullying and how to deal with it will not be the same after reading this book. The act of bullying, and the role of the victim, the victim’s family, the bully, the bystander, the school and parents–all are clearly defined using related examples and resources. Understanding more about the details of the sociology and psychology behind bullying helped me to understand more clearly what is going on in a bullying situation and the consequences to those affected. I appreciated the balance found in this book–the roles of the victim, the bully and the family, even the bystander, were treated objectively and honestly. {Read More}

A couple of more reviews are scheduled, including one over at San Antonio Mom Blogs [ETA: review link ]and another one at Homeschooling Hatters.  If you’d like to learn more about the book–including how to purchase it, take a look at my “Books” page here at RW&G.

If you’ve read my new book, I’d love to hear your reactions, too. Reach out to me here or via Facebook or Twitter. (An honest review over on Amazon, BarnesandNoble.com, and Goodreads would be much appreciated, too.)

If you’d like to WIN a copy of the book, be on the lookout for a featured giveaway here on the blog!

UPDATE: I forgot to mention Barry Gelston’s review on Tumblr! (Sorry, Barry! Mea culpa!). He wrote:

Gifted, Bullied, Resilient is a wonderful opportunity for parents of gifted children to get their heads around the system of bullying. I wish that I had this book when my son was young. I would have had a better understanding of the signs of bullying and would have done a better job to support him. Talented outlier children are a unique bunch that do not fit into the norm. Pamela does a great job of helping us to make these connections. {Read More}

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[Book Review] Gifted, Bullied, Resilient: A book for every gifted adult


There are so many great reviews incoming about my book, but this one, by Madeline Goodwin, is my current favorite.

When I was writing “Gifted, Bullied, Resilient,” I never dreamed that gifted kids, teens, and young adults would read it. And yet Madeline and others have done just that. In fact, at my talk during the SENG 2015 conference last week in Denver, one parent told me that her gradeschool-aged daughter read the prologue and slept soundly for the first time in a long while. As an author, that’s an amazing story. As a human, it’s downright humbling.

I hope you’ll take a moment to read what Madeline wrote over on her blog.

Originally posted on Madeline's Musings:

Pamela Price‘s new book, Gifted, Bullied, Resilient, describes the social stigma of being different, the pain of bullying, and the immense strength it takes to get through the damage, short-term and long-term, that such actions cause. For me, it was an eye-opening, third-person view into many of the social struggles I have faced.

In her prologue, Price offers a series of scenarios, which set the tone for her book. She draws from her own experiences as a parent and a professional, and provides a refreshingly honest description of the impacts bullying can have on people, even years afterward. Her tools for handling bullying as parents can be adjusted to fit many adult scenarios, particularly with regard to incidents at schools versus work.

Just recently I had a workplace experience in which my needs as a 2e adult were viewed as laziness, and I became the subject of relational aggression. A few…

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